Movie review

Gravity.

‘Gravity’ is not just a movie, it’s a whole experience.

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‘Gravity’ opens with a floating scene of Earth and space and all the beauty a camera can fit into an image, or series of images, taken out in the vast universe. Ryan Stone, a medical engineer, and Matt Kowalski, an austronaut, are facing the same destiny of destruction when the Russians blow up their own satelite to cause an attack of debris, flying fiercely at bullet speed. Starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, left adrift in space thanks to anti-gravity, they are trying so desperately to save their lives after this crucial catastrophe. However, the horror doesn’t end there. After a series of unforunate events, Clooney’s amusing character disappears into space and Sandra finds herself completely alone, devastated, trying to figure out an escape plan while running out of oxygen.

What do you do when you’re left all by yourself, having nothing but your survival instincts conquered by fear and your oxygen slowly slipping away? How do you fight with the outer world that doesn’t seem to be helping you? And, most importantly, how do you overcome the state of weakness of your own inner world?

How do you stay strong when the challenge of surviving has become impossible?

From the sense of helplessness to the rebirth of hope, from the loosened courage to the recollected adrenaline rush of feeling alive, ‘Gravity’ goes into an exploration of how far the human spirit can go and survive. Or is it limitless the potential we as human beings have?

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Movie review

First Rule of Fight club.

The first rule of Fight Club is: you do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: you DO NOT talk about Fight Club! 

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We live in a world where people are slaves to the material belongings and the need to constantly buy more and more. We know the prices of things, but we are not aware of their actual meaning or value. We no longer appreciate either the little things in life, or the relationships we’ve developed with each other. We are used to taking things for granted and we don’t care if our lives pass into the framework of routines as we simply don’t realize it.

Why do we spend so much time building a material world around us, when all that really matters can’t be bought? Is life complicated, or are we making it that way?

“Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy shit we don’t need. We’re the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our Great War’s a spiritual war… our Great Depression is our lives. We’ve all been raised on television to believe that one day we’d all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars. But we won’t. And we’re slowly learning that fact.”

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Movie review

Amour.

There is nothing sadder that the thought of how inevitable growing old is. It is not the idea of having wrinkles and gray hair that is scary though, but the fact that we would start to feel redundant in this world of transience. 2012_amour-e1356862996838 Austrian screenwriter and director Michael Haneke, probably best known for his movie “The White Ribbon”, creates another film whose purpose is to provoke. His work, usually defined as “disturbing”, deals with the problems and failures of the world we live in. A bit different than his usual dynamic style, however, “Amour” is a silent, sincere and stretched look at the adulthood. It is a movie that absorbs both your attention and emotions, keeping them focused on the subject long after the end. “Amour” tells the story of two people who are together, both in good, and in bad, in their inwrought destinies. George (Jean-Louis Trintignant) and Anna (Emmanuelle Riva) are two retired musicians. Their daughter (Isabelle Huppert), also a musician, has abandoned the home nest and now lives abroad with her family. Having their love tested through the years as a couple in their eighties, they now have to face the greatest challenge of them all. When Anna has a stroke, half her body gets paralyzed, and George has to be constantly around her, looking after the worsening state of her fragility: a task unbearable at times.

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